Posts

Chasing Dark Skies on Dartmoor (Capturing the Milky Way and More under Pristine Skies)

Image
In this article for the first time, I am chasing dark skies by doing astronomy in the wild, this allows you to see things that are not just possible to see from urban areas. So hopefully this article will inspire you to do the same. In today's world, seeing the night sky is increasingly difficult. Light pollution has been slowly getting worse reducing what we can see in the sky. In London where I am usually based the sky is orange and only the brightest stars are usually visible with the naked eye. So, I really need to go off the grid to find somewhere that is remote enough to be dark. In a country like the UK, where the cities and towns are quite close together, it will take quite some time to escape the light pollution. To do this I decided to go to the Dartmoor national park, in the south west of England. As far as Dartmoor is concerned, I decided to explore the northern section, as it would be dark since there are no other settlements nearby and the Exmoor national park is als

How to Collimate a Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope (SCT)

Image
In this article I am going to discuss the collimation of SCT's this is a worry for a lot of people, but in fact it is quite simple and even more important that an aligned finderscope or clean eyepieces . 

Astronomy Challenge: Observing the Moons of Uranus

Image
My first ever astronomy challenge piece challenges you to observe the moons of Uranus, since Uranus is a dim planet out in the outer reaches of our solar system about 1.5 billion kilometres from the Sun.

How to Find the Owl Nebula (M97)

Image
M97 is a planetary nebula in the constellation Ursa Major. It is also known as the owl nebula and for obvious reasons it appears to have owl eyes. 

Turn any Telescope into a Solar Telescope

Image
This article will show you how to turn any telescope, pair of binoculars, or camera into a solar telescope by using solar safety film. Solar safety film can be added to the front of any optical instrument and you can buy it as a plain sheet of solar safety film . You can then cut it to the size you want and mount it on the front. Before using any solar film, you should always check that it does not have any holes. To do so, you need to hold the film up to a source of light to make sure no light is shining through. You can then attach it to your telescope or binoculars, remember if you attach it to binoculars to cover both objective lenses. Do remember to securely attach the filters so they do not fall off accidentally. Once on there you can look through there with a camera or your own eyes and you will be able to see the sun. Another important safety step is that before doing any solar observing is to make sure you cover up the finderscopes or other optical equipment that you are not a

Can YOU Really Name a Star or Buy Land on the Moon

Image
In this article I am going to discuss if it is possible for a normal person to buy something in space. There are many websites that will offer you the opportunity to name a star, but is that genuine?

How to find the Starfish Cluster (Messier 38)

Image
In this article we are going to talk about how to find the Starfish Cluster M38. The Starfish Cluster can be quite beautiful. Some of the most beautiful sights in the night sky are open star clusters, such as the Pleiades cluster, which looks like a miniature version of the Plough or Big Dipper. 

Stargazing During a Full Moon - There is More to See Than You Might Think

Image
You have finally got a clear night and of course it is the full moon. What are you going to do? Well, obviously you can observe the Moon directly, but you will have to use a moon filter to do that. If you do not then you are not going to see the fine details.

How to find the Blue Snowball Planetary Nebula (NGC 7662)

Image
This article examines a spectacular type of object created by a star's final act, a planetary nebula, or more specifically, the Blue Snowball Nebula. Other names that are commonly used for this nebula include NGC 7662, Caldwell 22, and Snowball Nebula.

How to Observe a Dwarf Planet as an Amateur Astronomer - by finding Ceres

Image
Dwarf planets are largely ignored in amateur astronomy probably because they are not as impressive as some of the beautiful nebulae or galaxies in the night sky.